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Microsoft Releases June Patch Tuesday Updates for Windows 10

It’s Patch Tuesday again and today Microsoft is rolling out cumulative updates for all supported versions of Windows 10 and Server. Here is a look at what you can expect.

Microsoft today is rolling out a new round of cumulative updates for supported versions of Windows for this month’s Patch Tuesday. The new update for Windows 10 1809 aka “October 2018 Update” comes in the form of KB4503327. And if you are running the latest feature update, version 1903 aka “May 2019 Update” (now available), it comes in the form of KB4503293. As usual, there are no new features, but the patches do include several security fixes and overall system improvements for your system.

Windows 10 KB4503293 for Windows 10 1903 Maybe 2019 Update

This update will bump your build number to 18362.175 and includes the following fixes:

  • Addresses a security vulnerability by intentionally preventing connections between Windows and Bluetooth devices that are not secure and use well-known keys to encrypt connections, including security fobs. If BTHUSB Event 22 in the Event Viewer states, “Your Bluetooth device attempted to establish a debug connection….”, then your system is affected. Contact your Bluetooth device manufacturer to determine if a device update exists. For more information, see CVE-2019-2102 and KB4507623.
  • Security updates to Windows Virtualization, Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Server, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows SQL Components, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, and Internet Information Services.

Windows 10 KB4503327 for Windows 10 1809 October 2018 Update

This update will bump your build to 17763.557 and includes the following list of fixes and improvements:

  • Addresses an issue that may prevent the Windows Mixed Reality keyboard from rendering correctly in some applications.
  • Addresses a security vulnerability by intentionally preventing connections between Windows and Bluetooth devices that are not secure and use well-known keys to encrypt connections, including security fobs. If BTHUSB Event 22 in the Event Viewer states, “Your Bluetooth device attempted to establish a debug connection….”, then your system is affected. Contact your Bluetooth device manufacturer to determine if a device update exists. For more information, see CVE-2019-2102 and KB4507623.
  • Addresses an issue that may prevent the Preboot Execution Environment (PXE) from starting a device from a Windows Deployment Services (WDS) server configured to use Variable Window Extension. This may cause the connection to the WDS server to terminate prematurely while downloading the image. This issue does not affect clients or devices that are not using Variable Window Extension.
  • Adds updated Broadcom Wi-Fi firmware to Microsoft HoloLens. For more information, see Advisory 190016.
  • Addresses an issue that may prevent Internet Explorer 11 from opening if the Default Search Provider is not set or is malformed.
  • Security updates to Microsoft Scripting Engine, Internet Explorer, Microsoft Edge, Windows App Platform and Frameworks, Windows Input and Composition, Windows Media, Windows Shell, Windows Server, Windows Authentication, Windows Cryptography, Windows Datacenter Networking, Windows Storage and Filesystems, Windows SQL components, the Microsoft JET Database Engine, Windows Virtualization, Windows Kernel, and Internet Information Services.

All other currently supported versions of Windows 10 are getting cumulative updates today, too. If you have automatic updates enabled, you should receive them in the coming days. Or, to stay on top of things, head to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update to check.

Note that there are a few known issues with these updates depending on the version of the version you’re running. Make sure to read Microsoft’s Windows 10 Update History page for release notes related to the version you’re running.

If you have issues that aren’t resolved with the documented workarounds, remember that you can roll them back. For more on that, read our article on how to uninstall Windows 10 cumulative updates.


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