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Windows 11 Receives First-Ever Patch Tuesday Updates

It’s that time of the month again with Patch Tuesday, and today Windows 11 is receiving its first set of cumulative updates. Here’s what to expect.

It’s that time of the month again, and Microsoft is releasing its first Patch Tuesday updates for Windows 11. The new update comes in the form of KB5006674. The new OS will receive monthly build updates for users running the stable version of Windows 11. This is what the company did with Windows 10, too. As is usually the case with cumulative updates, there are no new features to report with this version, but it will bump your build to 22000.258.

Patch Tuesday Update KB5006674 for Windows 11

This update doesn’t include a whole lot, but the changelog reports the following quality fixes and improvements:

  • Addresses known compatibility issues between some Intel “Killer” and “SmartByte” networking software and Windows 11 (original release). Devices with the affected software might drop User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets under certain conditions. This creates performance and other issues for protocols based on UDP. For example, some websites might load slower than others on the affected devices, which might cause videos to stream slower in certain resolutions. VPN solutions based on UDP might also be slower.

It’s also worth mentioning that it includes improvements to the Windows 11 Servicing Stack update: 22000.190:

  • This update makes quality improvements to the servicing stack, which is the component that installs Windows updates. Servicing stack updates (SSU) ensure that you have a robust and reliable servicing stack so that your devices can receive and install Microsoft updates.

Get Windows 11 Updates

Once you enable automatic updates on your system, you should see the new updates in the next couple of days. Or you can stay on top of things by manually heading to Settings > Update & Security > Microsoft Update to check and download the updates.

Older versions of Windows 10 may receive updates today, too. Make sure to read the documentation on the Windows 10 Update History page for your version’s full release notes.

If something breaks after you install today’s updates and cannot be resolved by Microsoft’s documented workarounds, you can roll them back.

Also, note that you can view Windows 11 Update History if you want to keep track of the updates you’ve received.

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