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Netflix: TV and Cable Providers Attack

TV providers start fighting back against Netflix

Dish Network’s Blockbuster on October 1 delivered a tasty alternative for miserable Netflix customers. It’s called Blockbuster Movie Pass — hyped up as, execs say, “the most comprehensive TV entertainment programming package ever delivered by a multichannel pay TV provider.”

Quite a promise. Here’s the offering:

  • Over 100,000 titles available on DVD
  • Stream thousands of movies to your TV or PC
  • Unlimited movies, TV shows and games by mail
  • Unlimited in-store exchanges
  • Plus over 20 great entertainment channels.

That all sounds like a great package — except maybe the in-store exchange. When was the last time you saw a brick and mortar Blockbuster?

Comcast, too, is in with a wide selection of streaming programing for no extra charge. gives you access to all the extras you’re already paying for on your normal TV cable bill, including HBO. The new interface is similar to the current Netflix interface, where you can browse and sort movies.

It was only a matter of time until these television providers tried to get a foot in the door for online content. No better time for them than now, when so many Netflix customers are upset and rethinking their plans.


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3 Responses to Netflix: TV and Cable Providers Attack

  1. AR October 5, 2011 at 8:28 pm #

    I definitely think it was the best time for DISH Network and Blockbuster to come out with this new service! I was one of those angry Netflix subscribers but now since I get the Blockbuster Movie Pass through my TV provider/employer DISH for only $10/month I can gladly say goodbye to Netflix and get much more all on one bill and from one provider!

    • Jordan Austin October 5, 2011 at 10:02 pm #

      AR, thanks for your response. It’s good to know that there are some alternative out there.

      Thanks for reading.


    • Steve Krause October 6, 2011 at 5:50 pm #

      Hi @AR, I’m curious what you think the future of Youtube is? Do you think it will ever go from consumer camera phone movies to real prime-time TV and movies?

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