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Windows 8.1 Removed the Experience Index, Here’s How to See Your Score

I guess I’m not sure how many people used the Windows Experience Index (WEI). Its first iteration in Windows Vista was less than helpful. It did get better in Windows 7 and allows you to judge a system’s hardware at a glance. It can be handy when building your own gaming rig or after installing some new hardware. Other than that…maybe for bragging rights?

Here’s a look at the WEI Score feature that was in Windows 7:

WEI Tool Windows 7

Because no one used it or even knew it existed, Microsoft removed the feature. But maybe you’re curious about the type of index score you would get for your new high end hardware.

We’ve already covered one utility that will give you the WEI score via the command prompt. But these following two utilities are simple to run and offer more features and a better graphical interface.

Winaero WEI Tool v1.0

The Winaero developers have been creating cool free Windows gadgets and utilities for years.This is yet another quality tool that will give your Windows Experience Index in an easy way. Besides looking like the original WEI from Microsoft, it aslo allows you to save it as a PNG file, take a screenshot and upload to ImgUR and save it as an HTML file.

It’s also worth noting that not installation is required so you can run it from a flash drive or network location. Just unzip it to a convenient location and run the WEI executable file.

WEI Tool

Download Winaero WEI Tool

Metro Experience Index

While the Winaero WEI tool definitely looks familiar, the Metro Experience Index does the same thing, but provides a new twist on the interface. It was released during the Windows 8.1 Preview phase and hasn’t been updated since, but it does the job.

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Do note that you need to install this one, unlike the WEI Tool above.


After installed, just go ahead and run it and your experience index will be displayed in metro style colors.


Download Metro Experience Index

I ran both of these tools on several Windows 8.1 systems, and they both gave me the same results. So I can’t really recommend on over the other. Well, because you don’t need to install Metro Experience Index v1.0 I lean toward it.

So what’s your take? Do you miss the built-in Windows Experience Index tool in Windows 8.1? Or didn’t you even know about it or miss it? Leave a comment below and let us know your thoughts!

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